Virtual Programs

We are offering these FREE virtual programs to help our community continue to learn about the nature and culture of the Carolina Piedmont. Please support our work by making a donation here.

What's InSTORE Fridays
Fridays via Facebook join our Store Manager as he highlights items from our online gift shop with tips for easy entertaining and gift shop deals. Check out our gift shop at chmuseums.myshopify.com/


Museum of York County

Wild Wonders •  January 22  •  10 a.m.  •  Facebook Live
Tune in each time to learn about a critter or plant from the Carolinas and beyond! 


Historic Brattonsville

Time Travel Tuesdays
Historic Brattonsville is offering programs via Historic Brattonsville's Facebook page and Culture & Heritage Museums' YouTube channel.  

January 4 - New Year’s Traditions of the 19th Century
For people in the 19th century, holidays could have multiple meanings. Not only did people’s rituals around holidays change over time, but one’s social class could change that celebration, too. The planter class celebrated the highs of the dawning New Year, while enslaved people dreaded the terrible lows of “Heartbreak Day,” when families were often separated. Join us as we look at the complexities of New Year’s Day in the 19th century. 

 January 11 - “Polly Put the Kettle On”: A Nursery Rhyme Meal
Learn the origins of some favorite nursery rhymes, and check out recipes for some of the foods they mention!

January 18 - Natural Dyeing Series: Black Walnut
Join us for the third installment of our Natural Dyeing Series! This week we’ll be talking about Black Walnut. We’ll discuss the multiple uses for the Black Walnut tree throughout history, from its bark to the walnut itself. We will also dive into the history of dyeing with the Black Walnut and its beautiful, rich brown color.

January 25 - Herbal Medicine in Enslaved Communities
While John Bratton, Sr., was known to practice medicine around York County, the enslaved people likely treated and prevented common illnesses amongst each other using herbal remedies. We will look closer at these traditional practices.

For the people in 19th century, holidays could have multiple meanings. Not only did people’s rituals around holidays change over time, but one’s social class could change that celebration, too. The planter class celebrated the highs of the dawning New Year, while enslaved people dreaded the terrible lows of “Heartbreak Day,” when families were often separated. Join us as we look at the complexities of New Year’s Day in the 19th century.